Soprano Recorder Fingerings

Two kinds of recorders:  German fingering recorders use a simple F fingering. English, or Baroque recorders use a forked F. How can you tell which recorder you have?  Play an F on the piano.  If your recorder sounds the same as the piano when you play the simple fingering for F, you have a German fingering recorder.  If your recorder sounds higher in pitch than the piano, you need to use the Baroque fingering - the forked F to make your pitch match.  On the fingering chart, the German and the Baroque fingerings are labelled.  Many recorder manufacturers print the letter G or a B under the thumb hole on the back of the recorder.  If your recorder has the letter G under the thumb hole, it is a German fingering recorder.  If your recorder has the letter B under the thumb hole, it is a Baroque recorder.  Different brands of recorders may require slight alterations of the fingerings shown, especially in the high register.  If a note does not sound in tune with the fingering shown, try altering the fingering or adjusting tuning by slightly opening or closing the thumb hole.
 
Flute, clarinet, and saxophone all use the same "easy F"  fingering as the German recorder.  More difficult instruments such as oboe and bassoon, use the "harder F" fingering that is used on the Baroque recorder.

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